The liquid bandage goes natural!

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helichrysum by candiru @ FlickrToday’s medical technology makes it possible for you to skip the bandages and “paint” on a layer of liquid bandage, or liquid stitches, mimicking new skin. This new skin is made of a polymer dissolved in a solvent. The polymer may have a name like polyvinylpyrrolidone (do you see the word “vinyl” in there?) or polymethylacrylate-isobutene-monoisopropylmaleate (can someone hand me a pronunciation guide, please?)

Or, you can use something much more pronounceable and much more natural!

Nature’s Liquid Bandage

Helichrysum is not necessarily the easiest word to pronounce, but it’s a lot easier than  polymethylwhateveritismaleate, wouldn’t you agree?

Helichrysum essential oil – a fusing oil –  can be used to stop bleeding. In the case of a nose bleed, for instance, you can put a couple of drops on a cotton bud and wipe the inside of the bleeding nostril.

The time that I seem to use Helichrysum the most is when I’m slicing veggies on my mandoline. Without fail (and without using the safety guard), I’ll slice the tip of at least one finger. And out comes the Helichrysum. Just one drop acts exactly like a liquid bandage.

Steam distilled from the flower of the helichrysum plant, this is one of the more expensive oils in the essential oil toolkit. But the benefits are worth it! Use it with Lavender to soothe psoriasis. Look for evidence of skin renewal when you apply it to scars. Add it to Sandalwood and Lemon to ease coughs and congestion. And those pesky stretch marks are no match for a blend of Helichrysum and Myrrh!

There are many other uses for Helichrysum, and we can explore those at a later date, but also know that it’s a great oil to support in the healing of wounds without scarring!

Helichrysum image by candiru @ Flickr

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